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Events and Public Courses 

ALL THE FOLLOWING EVENTS AND COURSES WILL BE HELD VIA VIDEOCONFERENCING

Fall 2020 open house and information sessions:

Saturday, November 7, 11 AM.

The New York Graduate School of Psychoanalysis is for people whose highest degree at the time of admission is a bachelor’s degree and are interested in obtaining an MA in Psychoanalytic Studies.  This program provides a solid foundation in psychoanalytic theory and, for those who desire it, comprehensive preparation for psychoanalytic training.  Since many graduates of the New York Graduate School of Psychoanalysis go on for clinical training at the Center for Modern Psychoanalytic Studies (where they are granted advanced placement), both programs will be discussed. Sign up now.

2020 Fall brochure of events on the NYGSP and CMPS campus [download print version]

 

Introduction to Modern Psychoanalysis
(Survey Course Open to the Public)

Ten Wednesdays: 7:10 - 8:40 PM, Beginning September 16. $500

15 CE CREDITS FOR SOCIAL WORKERS

This popular course offers the fundamentals of modern psychoanalytic theory and technique to those considering psychoanalytic training. Topics include transference, resistance, countertransference, and emotional communication. Open to clinicians and the public.

Register now

 

One-Year Program
(Survey Course Open To The Public)

Ten Mondays: 6 – 9:10 PM. Beginning September 24. Mail in applications due August

30 CE CREDITS PER SEMESTER FOR LICENSED PSYCHOANALYSTS AND SOCIAL WORKERS

The One-Year Program in Modern Psychoanalysis offers a solid foundation in modern psychoanalytic theory and technique.  The four component courses are designed to be useful to practitioners and non-practitioners alike. An introduction to psychological development, both healthy and distorted, imparts an understanding of the rationale for psychoanalytic treatment.  Key aspects of the treatment process, including transference, resistance, countertransference, and analytic listening, are studied from the perspectives of patient and practitioner.  Participants gain a sense of themselves as therapeutic agents and begin to develop skills applicable in both clinical and other life situations.  Classes are taught in a supportive, discussion-oriented format.  Continuing education credits are offered to social workers and psychoanalysts.

Apply now

 

The Psychoanalytic Instrument: Possibility, Form, and Risk (Presentation)

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2020 | 7:30 — 9:30 PM

2 CE CREDITS FOR LICENSED PSYCHOANALYSTS AND SOCIAL WORKERS

Historically, psychoanalysis has underestimated, watered down, even denied the inherent risks of the clinical situation. This combustible arrangement invites the patient’s passionate attachment and desire, with the abstinent analyst functioning as a deliberately incendiary human lure. That mortal vehicle is always vulnerable (analysts can die) as well as fallible (they can err). Paradoxically, the humanness of the analyst is not only a source of tragic potential but, at the same time, the method’s fundamental engine. As a means to understand why, and how, this clinical situation works, the paper explores Freud’s beautiful brief essay “On Transience.” Freud’s phrase there – “scarcity value in time” – is at the heart of that engine, the power of the psychoanalytic form. Form limits and, at the same time, increases possibility for meaning. Examples, in addition to “On Transience,” include a poem by Ben Jonson, Freud’s classic narrative known as “fort-da,” Winnicott’s “set situation,” and the clinical process itself.

Ellen Pinsky, PsyD, came to psychoanalysis as a second profession following 25 years as a middle school English teacher. She says her experience in the classroom with 12- and 13-year-olds taught her most of what she needed to know to become a creditable clinician. About her book, Death and Fallibility in the Psychoanalytic Encounter: Mortal Gifts (Routledge, 2017), Thomas Ogden writes, “Mortal Gifts is a necessary book—necessary for analysts and necessary for the analyses they conduct. In it, Ellen Pinsky addresses a long-neglected issue in the practice of psychoanalysis: the analyst’s failure to include in the very fiber of the analysis the fact of his or her mortality.” She is on the faculty of the Boston Psychoanalytic Society & Institute, from which she graduated in 2006. In 2014 she was awarded BPSI’s Deutsch Prize for her essay “The Olympian Delusion” (JAPA, 2011).

Register now

 

Clinical Writing: Expanding the Parameters (Workshop)

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2020  |  9:00 AM — 1:00 PM

4 CE CREDITS FOR LICENSED PSYCHOANALYSTS AND SOCIAL WORKERS

In this workshop, participants will learn to write richer, more accessible, and creative clinical narratives, including vignettes, case studies, and clinical papers. We will explore how clinical writing can more faithfully capture the depth and breadth of the emotional life of psychoanalytic treatments. An important aim will be to open our writing up not only to the subjectivity of the patient but also to that of the psychoanalyst or psychotherapist as both unfold in the clinical process. Through writing exercises, participants will write their own clinical narratives, with a focus on expanding the parameters of traditional clinical writing.

Therese Ragen, PhD, is a graduate and faculty member of the New York University Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis, where she has taught courses on Ferenczi and contemporary psychoanalysis, relational theory, and clinical writing. Her writing has appeared in the literary journals Northwest ReviewThe Texas Review, and The Palo Alto Review, as well as in Contemporary Psychoanalysis. Her book The Consulting Room and Beyond: Psychoanalytic Work and its Reverberations in the Analyst’s Life was published by Routledge in 2009.

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The Reckoning of Psychoanalysis: Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Social Class (Workshop)

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2020  |  9:00 AM — 1:00 PM

4 CE CREDITS FOR LICENSED PSYCHOANALYSTS AND SOCIAL WORKERS

This workshop will examine aspects of human experience that have historically been neglected in psychoanalytic theory and practice–race, social inequality, and gender identity. These constructed categories of difference constitute a “repressed” symptomatically haunting psychoanalysis.

Patricia Gherovici, PhD, is a psychoanalyst and analytic supervisor. She is a cofounder and director of the Philadelphia Lacan Group; Associate Faculty, Psychoanalytic Studies Minor, University of Pennsylvania; Honorary Member of IPTAR; and Founding Member of Das Unbehagen. Her books include The Puerto Rican Syndrome (Other Press, 2003), winner of the Gradiva Award and the Boyer Prize; Please Select Your Gender: From the Invention of Hysteria to the Democratizing of Transgenderism (Routledge, 2010); and Transgender Psychoanalysis: A Lacanian Perspective on Sexual Difference (Routledge, 2017). She has published two edited volumes (with Manya Steinkoler), Lacan on Madness: Madness, Yes You Can’t (Routledge, 2015) and Lacan, Psychoanalysis, and Comedy (Cambridge University Press, 2016). Most recently, she published a collection (with Chris Christian), Psychoanalysis in the Barrios: Race, Class, and the Unconscious (Routledge, 2019). She just completed coediting Psychoanalysis, Gender, and Sexualities: From Feminism to Trans (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming).

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The Limits of Intimacy and the Intimacy of Limits in Psychoanalytic Work (Presentation)

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2020  |  7:30 — 9:30 PM

2 CE CREDITS FOR LICENSED PSYCHOANALYSTS AND SOCIAL WORKERS

Steven Cooper will explore how internal bad objects (Fairbairn’s term) are released in the process of analytic work. He will focus on the analyst’s countertransference experience of being perceived as bad, especially when that experience seems to be approaching the limit of what is bearable for the analyst, and he will explore how the analyst, in experiencing his or her own limits for bearing the patient’s “badness,” can contribute to the patient’s emotional growth.

Steven Cooper, PhD, is a training and supervising analyst at the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute. He is an associate professor of psychology in psychiatry (part-time) at Cambridge Health Alliance, Harvard Medical School. He served as joint editorin-chief of Psychoanalytic Dialogues from 2007 to 2012. He is currently on the editorial boards of the International Journal of Psychoanalysis, Contemporary Psychoanalysis, and Psychoanalytic Dialogues. Dr. Cooper is the author of three books and numerous articles on psychoanalysis. His books include Objects of Hope: Exploring Possibility and Limit in Psychoanalysis (Analytic Press, 2000), A Disturbance in the Field: Essays in Transference-Countertransference (Routledge, 2010), and The Melancholic Errand of Psychoanalysis: Exploring the Analyst’s Relationship to the Depressive Position (Routledge, 2016), in both English and Italian editions. He is an occasional commentator on film and popular culture on the Boston NPR station.

Register now