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Events and Public Courses 

ALL THE FOLLOWING EVENTS AND COURSES WILL BE HELD VIA ZOOM

Spring 2021 open house and information sessions:

Saturday, April 24, 1 PM, Sign up now

Friday, June 4, 5 PM, Sign up now

The New York Graduate School of Psychoanalysis is for people whose highest degree at the time of admission is a bachelor’s degree and are interested in obtaining an MA in Psychoanalytic Studies.  This program provides a solid foundation in psychoanalytic theory and, for those who desire it, comprehensive preparation for psychoanalytic training.  Since many graduates of the New York Graduate School of Psychoanalysis go on for clinical training at the Center for Modern Psychoanalytic Studies (where they are granted advanced placement), both programs will be discussed.

 

2021 Spring brochure of events on the NYGSP and CMPS campus [download print version]

 

Introduction to Modern Psychoanalysis
(Survey Course Open to the Public)

Ten Wednesdays: 7:10 - 8:40 PM, Beginning February 10. $500

15 CE CREDITS FOR SOCIAL WORKERS

This popular course offers the fundamentals of modern psychoanalytic theory and technique to those considering psychoanalytic training. Topics include transference, resistance, countertransference, and emotional communication. Open to clinicians and the public.

Register now

 

One-Year Program
(Survey Course Open To The Public)

Ten Mondays: 6 – 9:10 PM. Beginning February 8.

30 CE CREDITS PER SEMESTER FOR LICENSED PSYCHOANALYSTS AND SOCIAL WORKERS

The One-Year Program in Modern Psychoanalysis offers a solid foundation in modern psychoanalytic theory and technique.  The four component courses are designed to be useful to practitioners and non-practitioners alike. An introduction to psychological development, both healthy and distorted, imparts an understanding of the rationale for psychoanalytic treatment.  Key aspects of the treatment process, including transference, resistance, countertransference, and analytic listening, are studied from the perspectives of patient and practitioner.  Participants gain a sense of themselves as therapeutic agents and begin to develop skills applicable in both clinical and other life situations.  Classes are taught in a supportive, discussion-oriented format.  Continuing education credits are offered to social workers and psychoanalysts.

Apply now

 

CMPS Annual Conference

DREAMING THE SESSION: FIELD THEORY PERSPECTIVES ON HALLUCINOSIS, DREAMING, AND REVERIE IN DAILY CLINICAL WORK

SATURDAY, MARCH 20, 2021 | 9:30 AM — 4:00 PM

5 CE CREDITS FOR LICENSED PSYCHOANALYSTS AND SOCIAL WORKERS

Keynote Speaker: Giuseppe Civitarese

Featured Speakers: Lawrence Brown, Barbara D’Amato

The theory of dreams has changed fundamentally since Freud's time, when their primary function was seen as protecting sleep by distorting and hiding repressed material from consciousness. Many contemporary psychoanalysts emphasize the transformative function of dreams, to create sense and meaning for lived experience. Consequently, the way we use dreams in our daily clinical work has changed radically. The dream is no longer viewed as belonging exclusively to the analysand: We listen to virtually any verbal and nonverbal communication as a joint dream of the analytic couple, dreamed in the here and now. This paradigm shift will be discussed in light of analytic field theory and the phenomena of hallucinosis, dreaming, and reverie, both visual and somatic. Rich clinical examples will illustrate the theory and the application of this approach.

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Clinical Writing: Expanding the Parameters (Workshop)

SATURDAY, APRIL 10, 2021  |  9:00 AM — 1:00 PM

4 CE CREDITS FOR LICENSED PSYCHOANALYSTS AND SOCIAL WORKERS

In this workshop, participants will learn to write richer, more accessible, and creative clinical narratives, including vignettes, case studies, and clinical papers. We will explore how clinical writing can more faithfully capture the depth and breadth of the emotional life of psychoanalytic treatments. An important aim will be to open our writing up not only to the subjectivity of the patient but also to that of the psychoanalyst or psychotherapist as both unfold in the clinical process. Through writing exercises, participants will write their own clinical narratives, with a focus on expanding the parameters of traditional clinical writing.

Therese Ragen, PhD, is a graduate and faculty member of the New York University Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis, where she has taught courses on Ferenczi and contemporary psychoanalysis, relational theory, and clinical writing. Her writing has appeared in the literary journals Northwest ReviewThe Texas Review, and The Palo Alto Review, as well as in Contemporary Psychoanalysis. Her book The Consulting Room and Beyond: Psychoanalytic Work and its Reverberations in the Analyst’s Life was published by Routledge in 2009.

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The Reckoning of Psychoanalysis: Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Social Class (Workshop)

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2020  |  9:00 AM — 1:00 PM

4 CE CREDITS FOR LICENSED PSYCHOANALYSTS AND SOCIAL WORKERS

This workshop will examine aspects of human experience that have historically been neglected in psychoanalytic theory and practice–race, social inequality, and gender identity. These constructed categories of difference constitute a “repressed” symptomatically haunting psychoanalysis.

Patricia Gherovici, PhD, is a psychoanalyst and analytic supervisor. She is a cofounder and director of the Philadelphia Lacan Group; Associate Faculty, Psychoanalytic Studies Minor, University of Pennsylvania; Honorary Member of IPTAR; and Founding Member of Das Unbehagen. Her books include The Puerto Rican Syndrome (Other Press, 2003), winner of the Gradiva Award and the Boyer Prize; Please Select Your Gender: From the Invention of Hysteria to the Democratizing of Transgenderism (Routledge, 2010); and Transgender Psychoanalysis: A Lacanian Perspective on Sexual Difference (Routledge, 2017). She has published two edited volumes (with Manya Steinkoler), Lacan on Madness: Madness, Yes You Can’t (Routledge, 2015) and Lacan, Psychoanalysis, and Comedy (Cambridge University Press, 2016). Most recently, she published a collection (with Chris Christian), Psychoanalysis in the Barrios: Race, Class, and the Unconscious (Routledge, 2019). She just completed coediting Psychoanalysis, Gender, and Sexualities: From Feminism to Trans (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming).

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On the Analyst’s Shame

FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 2021  |  7:30 — 9:30 PM

2 CE CREDITS FOR LICENSED PSYCHOANALYSTS AND SOCIAL WORKERS

Although it is common to discuss the dynamics of a patient’s shame, what is often not discussed is the analyst’s shame, which remains secret and taboo. Doing so would reveal vulnerability and risk the judgment of others, yet it is the very thing we encourage in the consulting room. When shame is evoked in the analyst, it brings the analyst’s own developmental history into the transference-countertransference matrix. It can affect praxis and the treatment frame, altering the course and boundaries of the therapeutic alliance. The intense emotions may be almost unbearable, partly because the analyst feels it would be inappropriate to share them with the patient. Mills discusses the shame he experienced when idealized by a child patient who felt deep shame about having been physically abused, which resonated with the analyst’s own abuse history. The evoked feelings led to an intervention that was interactive and paternal, helping the patient to transcend his idealization of the analyst.

Jon Mills, PsyD, PhD, ABPP, is a Canadian philosopher, psychoanalyst, and clinical psychologist. He is on the faculty of the Adelphi University Postgraduate Programs in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy and is Emeritus Professor of Psychology and Psychoanalysis at the Adler Graduate Professional School in Toronto. The recipient of numerous awards for his scholarship, including four Gradiva Awards, he is the author and/or editor of 25 books. In 2015 he was given the Otto Weininger Memorial Award for lifetime achievement by the Canadian Psychological Association. He runs a mental health corporation in Ontario.

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Some Observations on the Psychodynamics of Race, Caste, Class, and Ethnic Differences in the Analytic Dyad

FRIDAY, MAY 7, 2021  |  7:30 – 9:30 PM

2 CE CREDITS FOR LICENSED PSYCHOANALYSTS AND SOCIAL WORKERS

Annie Lee Jones explores the shifting meanings of racialized experiences in the psychoanalytic dyad as differences along the lines of caste, class, race, and ethnicity emerge in the treatment. These differences are not just between people of different races–there are caste, class, and ethnic variations within the blackness or whiteness of analyst and analysand–and they are often projected or denied, providing rich material for exploration. Their complexity affects the transference-countertranference matrix in multiple ways.

Annie Lee Jones, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and psychoanalyst in private practice in Queens, New York. She is co-chair of the Committee on Ethnicity, Race, Culture, Class, and Language (CERCCL) at the New York University Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis, where she is also a faculty member in the Independent Track. She is a fellow and training analyst at the Institute for Psychoanalytic Training and Research (IPTAR), where she has taught a course on black psychoanalytic writers, and is on the faculties of the Adelphi University Postgraduate Program in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy Trauma Treatment Certificate Program and The Stephen Mitchell Relational Study Center. She also works as a clinical psychologist and is the Military Sexual Trauma Coordinator at the St. Albans Community Living Center of the US Department of Veterans Affairs New York Harbor Healthcare System, where she runs a telehealth clinic for individual and group psychotherapy. She is a founding member of Black Psychoanalysts Speak (BPS).

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Transference and the Moment of Catastrophe

SATURDAY, MAY 15, 2021  |  9:30 – 11:30 AM

2 CE CREDITS FOR LICENSED PSYCHOANALYSTS AND SOCIAL WORKERS

During this pandemic there have been catastrophic moments for many of us. A specific form of transference has been observed in the moment of catastrophe when time stops and speech becomes impossible. Davoine will present examples of this phenomenon, taken from the testimony of anesthesiologists and nurses working on the front lines, and will compare them with the “forward psychotherapy” devised for the treatment of victims of shell shock in World War I, which was the prototype of modern practice with traumatized patients.

Françoise Davoine, PhD, is a psychoanalyst in private practice in Paris. She trained in the École Freudienne de Paris, founded by Jacques Lacan, and was a member of that school until Lacan’s death and the school’s dissolution. She worked for thirty years as a psychoanalyst in public psychiatric hospitals in France as an external consultant. She was a professor for forty years at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS), where she and Jean-Max Gaudillière led a weekly seminar entitled “Madness and the Social Link” at the Center for the Study of Social Movements. She was an Erikson Scholar at Austen Riggs Center in the summer of 2017. She is the author of many articles and books, including History Beyond Trauma with Jean-Max Gaudillière (Other Press, 2004), Wittgenstein’s Folly (YBK, 2012), Mother Folly (Stanford University Press, 2014), Fighting Melancholia: Don Quixote’s Teaching (Karnac, 2016), A Word to the Wise: Don Quixote Returns to Fight Perversion with Jean-Max Gaudillière (Karnac, 2018).

Register now