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Bias, Hazing, Stalking, Sexual and Domestic Violence Information

Bias-Related Crime Defined

A person commits a bias-related/hate crime, commonly referred to as “harassment” or “discrimination,” when he or she commits a crime as defined by federal or state statutes “in whole or in substantial part because of a belief or perception regarding the race, color, national origin, ancestry, gender, religion, religious practice, age, disability, or sexual orientation of person. Such crimes can be committed against either person or property.

Prevention of Bias Related Crimes

School policy requires that all persons are treated with respect and understanding

NYGSP supports the elimination of biased language in its written and oral examination and requests that employees employ bias-free language principles in all its media.

Reporting Bias-Related Incidents

All members of the community are responsible for reporting incidents of bias related conduct. Any individual who believes he or she has been a victim of such conduct or who wishes to discuss an incident or seek guidance may contact any member of the faculty or administration. NYGSP will seriously and thoroughly investigate any complaints and take appropriate action, which can range from a recommendation of further analysis to suspension or expulsion. Victims of such offenses are strongly advised to discuss the issue in their psychoanalysis, a requirement for matriculation in the program.

In addition to reporting incidents to the school, the individual may seek legal redress. NYGSP will assist a member of the community.

Any student, staff member, or faculty who exercises bad faith and brings false, malicious, or frivolous charges may be subject to disciplinary action.

Reporting Crimes

Anyone who has been the victim of a crime or who believes him/herself to be a victim of a crime in a school related event can report the incident to the local law enforcement agency, the Sixth Precinct, at (212) 741-4841, in addition to any action taken with the school. NYGSP will cooperate fully with any legal investigation.

Additional guidance for crime victims can be found at the Office of Victim Services website: https://ovs.ny.gov/

Hazing

Hazing is any activity expected of someone joining or participating in a group that humiliates, degrades, abuses, or endangers them regardless of a person’s willingness to participate and includes the following actions.

“To haze another person, regardless of the person’s consent to participate. Hazing means an act that, as an explicit or implicit condition for initiation to, admission into, affiliation with, or continued membership in a group or organization, (1) could be seen by a reasonable person as endangering the physical health of an individual or as causing mental distress to an individual through, for example, humiliating, intimidating, or demeaning treatment, (2) destroys or removes public or private property, (3) involves the consumption of alcohol or drugs, or the consumption of other substances to excess, or (4) violates any University policy.” (From Cornell University definition)

All members of the NYGSP community are responsible for reporting incidents of hazing. Any individual who believes he or she has been a victim of hazing or who wishes to discuss an incident or seek guidance may contact any member of the faculty or administration. NYGSP will seriously and thoroughly investigate any complaints and take appropriate action, which can range from a recommendation of further analysis to suspension or expulsion. Victims of hazing are strongly advised to discuss the issue in their individual psychoanalysis (a requirement for matriculation in the program).

In addition to reporting incidents to the school, the individual may seek legal redress. NYGSP will assist a member of the community to do so. Any student, staff member, or faculty who exercises bad faith and brings false, malicious, or frivolous charges may be subject to disciplinary action.

For more information and resources on hazing, see: www.stophazing.org

Stalking

Stalking is a pattern of repeated and unwanted attention, harassment, contact, or any other course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to feel fear.

Stalking can include:

  • Repeated, unwanted, intrusive, and frightening communications from the perpetrator by phone, mail, and/or email.
  • Repeatedly leaving or sending victim unwanted items, presents, or flowers.
  • Following or lying in wait for the victim at places such as home, school, work, or recreation place.
  • Making direct or indirect threats to harm the victim, the victim’s children, relatives, friends, or pets.
  • Damaging or threatening to damage the victim’s property.
  • Harassing victim through the internet.
  • Posting information or spreading rumors about the victim on the internet, in a public place, or by word of mouth.
  • Obtaining personal information about the victim by accessing public records, using internet search services, hiring private investigators, going through the victim’s garbage, following the victim, contacting victim’s friends, family work, or neighbors, etc. (Source: Stalking Resource Center, National Center for Victims of Crime)

Any individual who believes he or she has been a target of stalking or who wishes to discuss an incident or seek guidance may contact any member of the faculty or administration. Victims of stalking are strongly advised to discuss the issue in their individual psychoanalysis (a requirement for matriculation in the program).

In addition to reporting incidents to the school, the individual may seek legal redress. NYGSP will assist a member of the community to do so. Any student, staff member, or faculty who exercises bad faith and brings false, malicious, or frivolous charges may be subject to disciplinary action.

For more information and resources on stalking, see: www.justice.gov/ovw/stalking#resource-tips

Domestic violence

Domestic Violence Defined: Also known as domestic abuse, domestic violence is a pattern of behavior used to establish power and control over another person through fear and intimidation, often including the threat or use of violence.

Some signs of domestic violence and abuse are more obvious than others. These are a few of the most common:

Does your partner ever…

  • Accuse you of cheating and being disloyal?
  • Make you feel worthless?
  • Hurt you by hitting, choking or kicking you?
  • Intimidate and threaten to hurt you or someone you love?
  • Threaten to hurt themselves if they don’t get what they want?
  • Try to control what you do and who you see?
  • Isolate you?
  • Pressure or force you into unwanted sex?
  • Control your access to money?
  • Stalk you, including calling you constantly or following you?

Any individual who believes he or she has been a victim of domestic violence or who wishes to discuss an incident or seek guidance may contact any member of the faculty or administration. Victims of domestic violence are strongly advised to discuss the issue in their individual psychoanalysis (a requirement for matriculation in the program).

In addition to reporting incidents to the school, the individual may seek legal redress. NYGSP will assist a member of the community to do so. Any student, staff member, or faculty who exercises bad faith and brings false, malicious, or frivolous charges may be subject to disciplinary action.

For more information and resources on domestic violence, see:

www.safehorizon.org/page/domestic-violence-get-help-10.html

or

www.manhattanda.org/resources-victims-domestic-violence